BOOK REVIEW:
Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim Encounters Christianity 

BOOK REVIEW

Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim Encounters Christianity by Nabeel Qureshi

Lori Herold is the FUMC librarian. We recently asked her to review some of the books available in our church library. This is the first installment.

By Lori Herold
True stories about coming to faith in Christ and the raw courage it can take are appealing.

Raised in the United States, Nabeel Qureshi was born into a devout and loving Muslim family. He describes his father whispering the Islam call to prayer when he was yet a baby and teaching him the way of Islam as he grew. His commitment to the Muslim faith may have continued to the end of his short life. But then, he met a Christian in high school and the two became best friends.

Through the years, Nabeel and his friend, David, had many conversations about their respective faiths. Even as Nabeel’s eyes were slowly being opened, he fought hard to prove the veracity of the Quran and the religion of Islam. Over the years, he sparred with David over every point of Christian doctrine that he believed or had been taught was false. Like dominoes, his arguments fell one by one until he was left with a choice…one that made him tremble at the thought of how his parents would react if he made that leap of faith in Christ. So, he had to be absolutely sure. He asked God and was granted three visions.

Here are a few things that make this book a good read. One, I learned more about Islam.

Two, Qureshi didn’t just take David at his word, he did his homework, deeply researching the claims of both Islam and of Christianity.

Most of all, I admired the courage in this story. Qureshi fought against the claims of Christianity until he was convinced all were true, and then had to face the possible estrangement of beloved parents as a result of his conversion.

But, this story isn’t just about the courage of Qureshi. It’s also about a faithful friend who was willing to take the long road of countless deep—and frequently hard—conversations. How could we affect our world if we had the courage to have those kinds of conversations?